Monthly Archives: November, 2012

Founding Parents privilege

Source: LA Weekly, Oct 2011 Anyone who’s seen the documentary Waiting for Superman will be familiar with the admissions process at a charter school. By law, if a school has more applicants than spaces, it must hold a public lottery. But often there is a side door. All applicants must participate in the lottery. But federal guidelines …

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Using Retrieval Practice to Improve Learning

Source: NYTimes, Sep 2011 A second learning technique, known as “retrieval practice,” employs a familiar tool — the test — in a new way: not to assess what students know, but to reinforce it. We often conceive of memory as something like a storage tank and a test as a kind of dipstick that measures …

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Diverse Charter Schools

Source: EducationNext, Winter 2013 Fueled by a confluence of interests among urban parents, progressive educators, and school reform refugees, a small but growing handful of diverse charter schools like Capital City has sprouted up in big cities over the past decade: others are High Tech High in San Diego; E. L. Haynes in Washington, D.C.; …

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Swimming to Graduate from MIT

Source: WSJ, Nov 2012 There is no clear count of how many U.S. colleges still make students demonstrate swimming skills. A 1997 survey by three North Carolina State University professors found that just 5% of four-year universities required swim tests, while at least 25% had them at one time. (In decades past, male students at …

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To Nurture Genius, Improve Gifted Education

Source: Scientific American, Nov 2012 In Brief Abilities matter. They are malleable, however, and need to be cultivated. Society needs to provide opportunities for intellectual enrichment to all students to ferret out hidden talents. Psychological strengths such as persistence, social skills and strategic risk taking are determining factors in the successful development of talent.

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MIT's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP)

On 27th Nov, I had shared the following with a HS student who was interested in learning more about MIT’s undergraduate research opportunities. Students have the opportunity to participate in research projects via the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, which is affectionately known as UROP. http://web.mit.edu/urop/basicinfo/index.html The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) cultivates and supports research …

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Struggling to Learn

Source: Mindshift, Nov 2012 …  how differently East and West approach the experience of intellectual struggle. “I think that from very early ages we [in America] see struggle as an indicator that you’re just not very smart,” Stigler says. “It’s a sign of low ability — people who are smart don’t struggle, they just naturally get …

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Pros and Cons of Online Education

Source: Cato Unbound website, Nov 2012 To review briefly I suggested that online education has the following advantages: Leverage of the best professors teaching more students. Large time savings from less repetition in lectures (students in control of what to repeat) and from lower fixed costs (no need to drive to university). Greater flexibility in …

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State Analysis Says Florida Charters Perform Better Than Traditional Schools

Source: NPR State Impact blog, Nov 2012 Student achievement data compiled by the Florida Department of Education suggests charter students are performing better than their peers in traditional schools. For the most recent report, the state had 456 charters operating in 43 school districts and at two state universities. The student population measured was 157,389 in …

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MIT InvenTeams

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